Shuruaat Ka Twist movie review: The six-part anthology is a mixed bag

Shuruaat Ka Twist movie reviewShuruaat Ka Twist movie review Shuruaat Ka Twist movie review: All six films have interesting premises.

Shuruaat Ka Twist movie cast: Neena Gupta, Chunky Pandey, Lalit Behl, Amit Sial, Trimala Adhikari, Rahul Bagga
Shuruaat Ka Twist movie directors: Hanish Kalia, Praveen Fernandes, Heena D’Souza, Sanjiv Kishinchandani, Avalokita Dutt, Gaurav Mehra
Shuruaat Ka Twist movie rating: Two and a half stars

Continuing the series of a compendium of short films of new directors mentored by established filmmakers, Humara Movie is out with Shuruaat Ka Twist, and like their previous outing (Shuruaat Ka Interval, 2014), this one is a mixed bag: a couple are good, the others strictly so-so.

This time around, the mentors included Vikramaditya Motwane, Rajkumar Gupta, Amit V Masurkar and Rajkumar Hirani.

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All six films have interesting premises. In Khauff, a psychiatrist pooh-poohs the fears of his going-to-pieces patient; the smugness with which he comes across bodes ill for those involved. Tap Tap has a has-been singer trying to re-invent himself and finding himself up against an aggressive neighbour. Adi Sonal shows a Sindhi household readying for a festival, keeping up a united front as the family members deal with fissures deep within. Bhaskar Calling features a persistent sales agent and an elderly Parsi gentleman: who will outwit the other? Two young women work their way around annoying boyfriends, lost cats, and scripts-that-are-not-coming-together in Gutthi. And Guddu features a young bride struggling through the minefield of convention and parental approval to find true love.

The ones that stood out for me were Guddu and Adi Sonal. The first has familiar beats —an unhappy bride, a belligerent daddyji– but has a satisfying completing of the loop. Adi Sonal has an unfair advantage in that it has the marvellous Neena Gupta at the helm, as well as the solid Trimala Adhikari, and an authentic lived-in feel of a traditional Sindhi household, which we don’t really get to see in the movies. You know how it will end, but still, it makes you smile.